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The first step to filing your federal income tax return is to determine which filing status to use. Your filing status is used to determine your filing requirements, standard deduction, eligibility for certain credits and deductions, and your correct tax. There are five filing statuses: Single, Married Filing Jointly, Married Filing Separately, Head of Household and Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child.
Here are eight facts about the five filing status options the IRS wants you to know so that you can choose the best option for your situation.

          1. Your marital status on the last day of the year determines your marital status for the entire year.

          2. If more than one filing status applies to you, choose the one that gives you the lowest tax obligation.

          3. Single filing status generally applies to anyone who is unmarried, divorced or legally separated according to state law.

          4. A married couple may file a joint return together. The couple’s filing status would be Married Filing Jointly.

          5. If your spouse died during the year and you did not remarry during 2010, usually you may still file a joint return with that spouse for the year of death.

          6. A married couple may elect to file their returns separately. Each person’s filing status would generally be Married Filing Separately.
          7. Head of Household generally applies to taxpayers who are unmarried. You must also have paid more than half the cost of maintaining a home for you and a qualifying person to qualify for this filing status.

  1. You may be able to choose Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child as your filing status if your spouse died during 2008 or 2009, you have a dependent child and you meet certain other conditions.
Eight Facts About Filing Status
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Here is What to do If You Are Missing a W-2
Before you file your 2010 tax return, you should make sure you have all the needed documents including all your Forms W-2. You should receive a Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, from each of your employers. Employers have until January 31, 2011 to send you a 2010 Form W-2 earnings statement.

If you haven’t received your W-2, follow these four steps:

1. Contact your employer If you have not received your W-2, contact your employer to inquire if and when the W-2 was mailed. If it was mailed, it may have been returned to the employer because of an incorrect or incomplete address. After contacting the employer, allow a reasonable amount of time for them to resend or to issue the W-2.

2. Contact the IRS If you do not receive your W-2 by February 14th, contact the IRS for assistance at 800-829-1040. When you call, you must provide your name, address, city and state, including zip code, Social Security number, phone number and have the following information:

          • Employer’s name, address, city and state, including zip code and phone
              number
          • Dates of employment
          • An estimate of the wages you earned, the federal income tax withheld, and
              when you worked for that employer during 2010. The estimate should be
              based on year-to-date information from your final pay stub or leave-and-
              earnings statement, if possible.

3. File your return You still must file your tax return or request an extension to file April 18, 2011, even if you do not receive your Form W-2. If you have not received your Form W-2 by the due date, and have completed steps 1 and 2, you may use Form 4852, Substitute for Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. Attach Form 4852 to the return, estimating income and withholding taxes as accurately as possible. There may be a delay in any refund due while the information is verified.

4. File a Form 1040X On occasion, you may receive your missing W-2 after you filed your return using Form 4852, and the information may be different from what you reported on your return. If this happens, you must amend your return by filing a Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.

Form 4852, Form 1040X, and instructions are available at http://www.irs.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
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